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Taxpayers received about $659 million in refunds during fiscal year 2023, representing a 2.7 percent increase in the amount of refunded to taxpayers in the previous fiscal year.


The IRS announced that final regulations related to required minimum distributions (RMDs) under Code Sec. 401(a)(9) will apply no earlier than the 2025 distribution calendar year. In addition, the IRS has provided transition relief for 2024 for certain distributions made to designated beneficiaries under the 10-year rule. The transition relief extends similar relief granted in 2021, 2022, and 2023.


The IRS, in connection with other agencies, have issued final rules amending the definition of "short term, limited duration insurance" (STLDI), and adding a notice requirement to fixed indemnity excepted benefits coverage, in an effort to better distinguish the two from comprehensive coverage.


The Tax Court has ruled against the IRS's denial of a conservation easement deduction by declaring a Treasury regulation to be invalid under the enactment requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).


For purposes of the energy investment credit, the IRS released 2024 application and allocation procedures for the environmental justice solar and wind capacity limitation under the low-income communities bonus credit program. Many of the procedures reiterate the rules in Reg. §1.48(e)-1 and Rev. Proc. 2023-27, but some special rules are also provided.


The IRS has provided a limited waiver of the addition to tax under Code Sec. 6655 for underpayments of estimated income tax related to application of the corporate alternative minimum tax (CAMT), as amended by the Inflation Reduction Act (P.L. 117-169).


The IRS has issued proposed regulations that would provide guidance on the application of the new excise tax on repurchases of corporate stock made after December 31, 2022 (NPRM REG-115710-22). Another set of proposed rules would provide guidance on the procedure and administration for the excise tax (NPRM REG-118499-23).


The Tax Code encourages charitable donations by businesses and industries. In fact, it is one tax incentive that President Bush has told his tax reform panel that he wants to preserve and strengthen. Taxpayers can make many different types of contributions, including inventory.

Many people are surprised to learn that some "luxury" items can be deductible business expenses. Of course, moderation is key. Excessive spending is sure to attract the IRS's attention. As some recent high-profile court cases have shown, the government isn't timid in its crackdown on business owners using company funds for personal travel and entertainment.

Owning a vacation home is a common dream that many people share...a special place to get away from the weekday routine, relax and maybe, after you retire, a new place to call home.

If you pay for domestic-type services in your home, you may be considered a "domestic employer" for purposes of employment taxes. As a domestic employer, you in turn may be required to report, withhold, and pay employment taxes on a calendar-year basis. The reporting rules apply to both FICA and FUTA taxes, as well as to income taxes that domestic employees elect to have withheld from their wages. The FICA tax rate, applied separately to the employer's share and the employee's share, is 7.65 percent.

This is a simple question, but the question does not have a simple answer. Generally speaking the answer is no, closing costs are not deductible when refinancing. However, the answer depends on what you mean by "closing costs" and what is done with the money obtained in the refinancing.

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